THE WRITER

 

 

For those who do not feel the need to make sense of the world, it serves them well. For others, the poets, the writers, the artists, they tell their stories in an attempt to make some sense of the world they live in, if only for themselves. This, in small part, explains how art is born.

Find a quiet dark spot and listen to Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata, or next time you’re in Madrid take a trip to the Museo Reina Sofia and look at Picasso’s Guernica, or pick up a copy of Camus’ The Stranger to get an idea. They were all composed as the artist was attempting to make sense of the world.

The writer may have come to their craft because they’ve realised that, at heart, they are outsiders, their immediate world is alien to them and they therefore need a method of expressing that alienation. Other endeavours act merely as weigh stations until the realisation hits that the time has come for them to try and talk themselves out of it.

For although everyone has a story to tell, not everyone has the facility to tell that story. Sometimes it’s given to others, knowing that the stories must be told, because we need them, subconsciously we know we need them, to sustain us.

What is certain is that whilst some are busy making the most of the world, there are others trying to make sense of it. What is also certain is that the talent being applied to this effort can overcome almost anything, even encouragement.

 

 

THE JOURNEY

 

 

 

 

 

 

For most of us, dare I say all of us, our lives are filled with the mundane. I’m sorry to break it to you this way, it may come as a shock. With the profound on the other hand, where an insight of emotional depth and intensity is revealed, we often, as individuals, as a society, flick pass it and shake our heads in wonder, not taking the time that is perhaps required to understand how it came to be, or perhaps even to see it at all.

 

 

THE NOVEL

 

An allegory, a tragedy, a meditation on the definition of success and failure.

Marty Culhane is heading out of town, he’s escaping to London. He has lost his girlfriend Tilda and their new born child in a collision with a long haul truck on an Australian country road, on their way to show the new born to Tilda’s parents.

There are road ghosts, amphetamines, careers on the slide, families not getting on and through all that, people trying to make good. Collisions everywhere, not just on the road.

 

Writing Worth Reading

A Question of Balance

Before I go on, I should preface my comments by saying that my intended audience for this missive is not the brain tumour community, they may read this and remark “tell me something I don’t already know”. It’s for anyone who may know a brain tumour survivor, or has met one, and who wonders what the fuss is about.

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Absolutely Nothing

Clive James, in answering a question about his writing life, a question about the writing process, answered thus, “I get up in the morning, make myself a cup of coffee, walk up the stairs to my office, stare out the window and do what all great writers must do, absolutely nothing.”

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A Profound Change

For most of us, dare I say all of us, our lives are filled with the mundane. I’m sorry to break it to you this way, it may come as a shock. With the profound on the other hand, where an insight of emotional depth and intensity is revealed, we often, as individuals, as a society, flick pass it and shake our heads in wonder, not taking the time that is perhaps required to understand how it came to be, or perhaps even to see it at all.

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Brain Tumour Awareness Week

I attended a conference this week, one where my qualification enabling me to attend consisted of being a brain tumour survivor. COGNO, it’s a grand acronym to be sure, stands for the Co-Operative Trials Group for Neuro Oncology, held in Melbourne, conveniently enough, during International Brain Tumour Awareness Week.

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Something Worth Writing

Following the 15 hour surgery on my brain 12 months ago, the whole left side of my body was left paralysed. There is still some way to go. My left hand still experiences constant pins & needles. It has about half of its required strength and dexterity. The neuro pathways, the synapse, from the brain to the hand still has obstacles.

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Reader Reviews

My first response is to say, "It's a great Aussie yarn!" and yet it is so much more. We anticipated a story about a car accident but discovered again, so much more. With his elegant style, Steve brings a community to life on Australian soil. It has a 1970's or 1980's...

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“Collision” is now available on eBook & real Book

Marty Culhane is heading out of town. He has lost his girlfriend Tilda and their new born child in a collision with a long haul truck on an Australian country road, on their way to show the new born to Tilda’s parents. He escapes to London. Things are not working out as planned. He decides to return to Australia with a crazy idea, he decides that he will confront the truck driver. While this is happening, his brother, Fergus, returns with his family from a holiday, to discover his successful corporate career at a crossroads, a boss who no longer feels the need to rely on him, and his son Toby, who he had predestined for sporting glory, with constant headaches that threaten every version of his own predetermined plan. There are road ghosts, amphetamines, careers on the slide, families not getting on and through all that, people trying to make good. It’s part allegory, part tragedy but mostly it’s a story of people attempting to come to terms with plans that don’t quite work out, attempting to resolve conflicts with each other and discovering fresh starts.